History/Tourism

Landmarks Of Delaware County: The Edward E. Neff House

1 Mar , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

We continue our ongoing look at the historic resources of Delaware County with a stop in the Northwest Neighborhood, home of an extraordinary collection of nineteenth and early twentieth century residences and churches.

Today, we look at a house which might best be known as the childhood home of a prolific and prominent architect.

The house at 123 North Franklin Street is a magnificent Queen Anne style structure. It was built by prominent local merchant Edward Erford Neff, who was born in 1830 in Dover, Ohio. Neff was married to Mary Ann Glover in 1862, and the couple went on to have three children — John, Addella, and Clarence. More…

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History/Tourism

Delaware County Roots: The War Governor

24 Feb , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

Over the last two centuries, Delaware County has produced a remarkable set of individuals who have led lives of discovery. This series will reveal short insights into the lives of the well-known and less commonly known people born here, or who lived here, and then went on to make significant contributions to state, regional, or national history.

The second Governor of the State of Kansas was a native Delaware Countian.

He was also someone so respected by his constituents that he earned the nickname, “The War Governor.”

His name was Thomas Carney, and he was born in 1824 near Berkshire. More…

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History/Tourism

Delaware County Roots: Willa Beatrice Player

11 Feb , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

Over the last two centuries, Delaware County has produced a remarkable set of individuals who have led lives of discovery. This series will reveal short insights into the lives of the well-known and less commonly known people born here, or who lived here, and then went on to make significant contributions to state, regional, or national history. We profile these individuals in our “Delaware Roots” series.

A pacsetting American educator once spent a handful of years living in the city of Delaware while attending Ohio Wesleyan University.

Willa Beatrice Player has the distinction of serving as the first African American woman in US history to serve as president of an accredited, four-year college. More…

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History/Tourism

When Delaware County Welcomed: The Fisk Jubilee Singers

10 Feb , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

Did you know that Delaware is one of the places where American musical history was made?

In fact, it was made over 149 years ago, in November 1871.

That month a concert took place in Delaware featuring a group of singers from Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee. That institution of learning, founded a few years previously to provide African American students with the best education possible, was struggling in the post-War south and faced bankruptcy. The idea was advanced by Fisk’s treasurer to have a number of students form a choir which would travel to raise funds for the college. More…

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History/Tourism

The Delaware Bicyclist Cured By Pink Pills

27 Jan , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

We ran across this rather strange advertisement the other day in an March, 1898 edition of a Chicago newspaper.

In a narrative ad, what online media types might today call a “sponsored post,” the purveyors of “Dr. Williams’ Pink Pills for Pale People” shared the story of a 17 year old Delaware girl.

Identifying her as Miss Bertha Reed, the daughter of Mr. J. R. Reed of 335 Lake Street, the advertisement begins by noting that “The healthfulness of bicycle riding for women is still a disputed question between eminent physicians and health reformers.” More…

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History/Tourism

Landmarks Of Delaware County: Williams’ Opera House

17 Jan , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

Lovers of the arts in 19th century Delaware knew the venue on East Winter Street very well. Williams’ Opera House was s staple of the city’s cultural scene, with its four storefronts on the street level and the large auditorium/opera house on the second floor.

The building originally featured a large mansard roof, giving the appearance of a third story. The 1885 Sanborn Map of Delaware, shown here, called it a “French roof.” More…

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History/Tourism

Delaware On The Map: The Beginning

9 Jan , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

We are re-launching our series, “Delaware On The Map,” which looks at how local history is revealed on maps — maps of the area, county, and nation.

Students of local lore will know that the city of Delaware had its origins in 1804 when Moses Byxbe came to central Ohio from Massachusetts. Four years later, he laid out a town on the east, then the west bank of the Olentangy River. More…

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History/Tourism

Rutherford B. Hayes And The Christmas Telegram

25 Dec , 2020  

By 1808Delaware

We’re continuing a holiday tradition here at 1808Delaware by sharing a Christmas story about Delaware’s best-known native.

Earlier this year, hundreds joined on the streets of downtown Delaware as a statute of President Rutherford B. Hayes was unveiled at the southwest corner of Sandusky and William Streets, a stone’s throw from the site of his birth. Throughout the year, much has been written about Hayes as the community came together to honor his legacy. More…

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Life in Delaware County

Esteemed Harvard Professor, OWU Alumnus, Delaware Native Dies

22 Dec , 2020  

By 1808Delaware

Delaware’s native son Ezra Feivel Vogel passed away on Sunday in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

During his youth, Vogel assisted his father in his clothing store, the People’s Store in downtown Delaware. He obtained his bachelor’s degree from Ohio Wesleyan University in 1950, and subsequently obtained a PhD from Harvard University where he taught for over 20 years. His final position there was as the Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences. More…

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History/Tourism

When Delaware County Welcomed: Mark Twain

16 Dec , 2020  

By: 1808Delaware – Updated

The date was February 10, 1885. That afternoon, three visitors to Delaware exited the train and secured transportation downtown. Making their way to the new City Hall and Opera House, they made their way to the second floor.

One of the men was a well-known novelist of the day, a man known for his written and vocal representations of life in the southern United States. One of the others was an American icon of the first order, an author, raconteur, and humorist.

The two, who were in the midst of their “Twins of Genius” Tour, were George Washington Cable and Samuel L. Clemens, better known as “Mark Twain.” More…

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Landmarks

Landmarks Of Delaware County: Templar Hall

9 Dec , 2020  

By: 1808Delaware

Today we’re sharing another post in our Landmarks of Delaware County series.

There are few buildings in central Ohio as connected with regional and national history as that at 17-19 North Sandusky Street in downtown Delaware. This spring and summer, the structure is reconnecting with its past in a very visual manner.

It is believed that the three story Templar Hall was constructed about 1853 or shortly thereafter. It was certainly standing on June 6, 1856, when it was the scene for the first visit and speech of noted national political and social leader Frederick Douglass in Delaware (see more about that visit here). More…

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History/Tourism

Landmarks Of Delaware County: The Hotel Blee

30 Nov , 2020  

By: 1808Delaware

The three story building sits prominently on the southwest corner of Union and Winter Streets, just as it has since 1890.

The Hotel Blee may have had a troubled beginning, but it continues to provide residential space 130 years later — albeit of a more long-term variety.

The sturdy brick structure at 42-46 East Winter Street was built as a hotel to replace a frame structure on the site, but that purpose didn’t last long. While it is not known who built the building, it is known that a railroad conductor was either involved or purchased the property very shortly after construction. More…

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