History/Tourism

When Delaware County Welcomed: Eleanor Roosevelt

16 Sep , 2022  

By 1808Delaware

Largely because of it being the home of Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware has had its fair share of famous visitors.

Presidents and First Ladies; Governors of Ohio; noted authors and politicians have included the city on speaking and engagement tours. In 1954, that included the former First Lady of the United States, Eleanor Roosevelt.

Roosevelt was on her own, of course, a highly respected political figure, diplomat, and activist. She engaged in frequent travel and was a noted public speaker. In January of that year her itinerary included an engagement at Ohio Wesleyan as part of a speaking tour at three Ohio colleges.

In her regular newspaper column (“My Day“) on January 19, 1954, she described her visit to Delaware and her lunch at Bun’s:

“Friday we spent most of the morning travelling from Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, to Ohio Wesleyan University. We arrived in Delaware, Ohio, in time to be taken for lunch to a delightful little restaurant run by a gentleman known as Mr. Bun because his father was a baker. His son is called “Biscuit” and another member of the family “Crumb,” so they are well identified with their occupation! The campus is separated by the village but really the village belongs to the campus and is part of it. More…

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History/Tourism

The Delaware Bicyclist Cured By Pink Pills

19 Aug , 2022  

By 1808Delaware

Recently updated. We ran across this rather strange advertisement the other day in an March, 1898 edition of a Chicago newspaper.

In a narrative ad, what online media types might today call a “sponsored post,” the purveyors of “Dr. Williams’ Pink Pills for Pale People” shared the story of a 17 year old Delaware girl.

Identifying her as Miss Bertha Reed, the daughter of Mr. J. R. Reed of 335 Lake Street, the advertisement begins by noting that “The healthfulness of bicycle riding for women is still a disputed question between eminent physicians and health reformers.” More…

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History/Tourism

Delaware On The Map: The Beginning

18 Aug , 2022  

By 1808Delaware

We are re-launching our series, “Delaware On The Map,” which looks at how local history is revealed on maps — maps of the area, county, and nation.

Students of local lore will know that the city of Delaware had its origins in 1804 when Moses Byxbe came to central Ohio from Massachusetts. Four years later, he laid out a town on the east, then the west bank of the Olentangy River. More…

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History/Tourism

Landmarks Of Delaware County: Williams’ Opera House

20 Jul , 2022  

By 1808Delaware

Lovers of the arts in 19th century Delaware knew the venue on East Winter Street very well. Williams’ Opera House was s staple of the city’s cultural scene, with its four storefronts on the street level and the large auditorium/opera house on the second floor.

The building originally featured a large mansard roof, giving the appearance of a third story. The 1885 Sanborn Map of Delaware, shown here, called it a “French roof.” More…

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History/Tourism

An Orderly Fourth Of July In Delaware 100 Years Ago – Except For A Stray Bullet, That Is

4 Jul , 2022  

By 1808Delaware

Independence Day weekend 2022 has been a busy, fun-filled time for many Delaware Countians, with is share of local mischief-making, of course.. One hundred years ago today, the Fourth was remarkably calm, according to newspaper accounts.

The Delaware Journal-Herald described it this way, “July 4 1922 will go down in record as the most orderly holiday in history as far as Delaware is concerned. A ‘safe and sane’ edict was announced by police and so well was that order obeyed that not one complaint was received at police headquarters during the day…”

That bucolic scene was tempered, however, by a strange occurrence. The newspaper account continued, “…except the demand for an investigation of a stray bullet that entered an east Delaware home.”

So the most peaceful Fourth in local history took place except for a “stray bullet.” More…

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History/Tourism

Delaware County Roots: The War Governor

25 Jun , 2022  

By 1808Delaware

Over the last two centuries, Delaware County has produced a remarkable set of individuals who have led lives of discovery. This series will reveal short insights into the lives of the well-known and less commonly known people born here, or who lived here, and then went on to make significant contributions to state, regional, or national history.

The second Governor of the State of Kansas was a native Delaware Countian.

He was also someone so respected by his constituents that he earned the nickname, “The War Governor.”

His name was Thomas Carney, and he was born in 1824 near Berkshire. More…

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History/Tourism

Landmarks Of Delaware County: The Edward E. Neff House

24 Jun , 2022  

By 1808Delaware

We continue our ongoing look at the historic resources of Delaware County with a stop in the Northwest Neighborhood, home of an extraordinary collection of nineteenth and early twentieth century residences and churches.

Today, we look at a house which might best be known as the childhood home of a prolific and prominent architect.

The house at 123 North Franklin Street is a magnificent Queen Anne style structure. It was built by prominent local merchant Edward Erford Neff, who was born in 1830 in Dover, Ohio. Neff was married to Mary Ann Glover in 1862, and the couple went on to have three children — John, Addella, and Clarence. More…

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History/Tourism

Delaware Roots: Brigadier General Allured Bayard Nettleton

18 Jun , 2022  

By 1808Delaware

Over the last two centuries, Delaware County has produced a remarkable set of individuals who have led lives of discovery. This series reveals short insights into the lives of the well-known and less commonly known people born here, or who lived here, and then went on to make significant contributions to state, regional, or national history.

In the last decade of the 19th century, a Delaware County native was selected for a prominent post in the federal government.

His name was Allured Brevard Nettleton – at least that is the name he used in testimony to the United States Congress during his time as Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, although his own grave marker uses the first name “Alvred.”

What is known for certain is that Nettleton was born in 1838 in Berlin Township to Hiram and Lavinia Nettleton; Hiram was a farmer from New Hampshire. Allured’s early years were spent in Delaware County, receiving a basic education while working on his father’s farm.

Showing promise, Nettleton was accepted and enrolled at Oberlin College, however he dropped out to enlist when President Lincoln made his first call for volunteers. He would spend a good deal of his time serving with General Philip Sheridan’s Cavalry Corps, serving in 72 separate engagements during the War. Because of his record, on mustering out on March 13, 1865, Nettleton received a Brevet promotion to the rank of Brigadier General. More…

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History/Tourism

Everything You Always Wanted To Know About: The First OWU-OSU Football Game

15 Jun , 2022  

By 1808Delaware

A new football season is coming up in a few months and so we thought we would share a gridiron-related post.

As those “in the know” know, the storied football history of The Ohio State University started right here in Delaware County. Here are details about the school’s first football contest, hosted by the Battling Bishops of Ohio Wesleyan University, which you may not know.

Date: May 3, 1890

Final Score: OSU 20, OWU 14 More…

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History/Tourism

Talk A Walking Tour Of Blue Limestone Park

15 Jun , 2022  

Special to 1808Delaware

On Tuesday, June 21, Delaware Historical Society Volunteers will present a walking tour of the history of Blue Limestone Park.

Blue Limestone Park is a hidden gem of the Delaware City Parks. It is named for the fine-grained “blue” Delaware limestone exposed by the last glaciers. Quarrying began around 1840 and the limestone was used for many buildings in Delaware. After quarry operations ceased in the 1930s, it filled with water and became a popular “swimming hole”. Later it became a private park and eventually a City park. There are many Blue Limestone Park ghost stories that have been repeated over the years. Reenactors of key people from 5 different phases of the site history, will speak on the tour.

Walking tours will begin at 4:30pm and go every half hour with the last tour beginning at 6pm and each will last about 90 minutes to 2 hours. Parking is available on-site or in the OWU parking lot located on John Street which can be accessed by either King Ave. off William St. or from Elizabeth St. More…

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