Ohio Wesleyan University

OWU Announces $11.25 Million Slocum Hall Renovation

30 Jun , 2021  

By Cole Hatcher, OWU

On June 20, 1898, Ohio Wesleyan University dedicated Slocum Hall as its new campus library – a spacious, modern building with a leaded glass ceiling that still draws gasps of wonder and delight from first-time visitors.

One hundred and twenty-three years later, Slocum Hall is beginning a new chapter as it undergoes an $11.25 million, donor-funded renovation to add modern amenities and redefine its future.

“This is a momentous project for Ohio Wesleyan, and I am grateful to our donors for helping us fully renovate and preserve a building beloved by generations of OWU alumni,” said President Rock Jones, Ph.D. More…

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History/Tourism

Landmarks Of Delaware County: The Hotel Blee

25 Jun , 2021  

By: 1808Delaware

The three story building sits prominently on the southwest corner of Union and Winter Streets, just as it has since 1890.

The Hotel Blee may have had a troubled beginning, but it continues to provide residential space 130 years later — albeit of a more long-term variety.

The sturdy brick structure at 42-46 East Winter Street was built as a hotel to replace a frame structure on the site, but that purpose didn’t last long. While it is not known who built the building, it is known that a railroad conductor was either involved or purchased the property very shortly after construction. More…

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History/Tourism

Hey, I Saw Your House In A Catalog: Sears Houses In Delaware: Updated

2 Jun , 2021  

Publisher’s Note: This story has been updated with additional information.

By 1808Delaware

If you live in Delaware, there’s a good chance that you might live near a residence that was bought out of a book.

A Sears catalog, to be exact.

According to Wikipedia, Sears Catalog Homes (sold under the Sears Modern Homes name) were catalog and kit houses sold primarily through mail order by Sears, Roebuck and Company, an American retailer. More…

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History/Tourism

Hayes Gives A Second Gettysburg Address: Memorial Day 1880

31 May , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

Memorial Day is being commemorated this weekend and Monday throughout Delaware County in many traditional ways, with parades, speeches, gatherings at local cemeteries, and family gatherings.

The holiday was originally established to commemorate the dead of the Civil War. Only 15 years after the end of that conflict, Delaware native President Rutherford B. Hayes gave a speech at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

We would like to share an excerpt from that speech with you today on this holiday weekend. More…

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Business, History/Tourism

RiverWest Partners Details Delaware Depot Development

13 May , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

In a Wednesday interview with WDLR News, representatives of Columbus’ RiverWest Partners talked about their plans to breathe new life in the vacant Big Four Depot at 60 Lake Street on the east side of downtown Delaware.

RiverWest’s Brenan Palma spoke with Mark Bingaman & Sherry Fisher of the Mid Ohio Breakfast Club about the most recent plans for the historic structure.

That interview can be easily listened to at this online location. More…

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History/Tourism, Ohio Wesleyan University

Landmarks Of Delaware County: OWU Student Observatory

9 May , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

In 1896, the campus of Ohio Wesleyan University welcomed a substantial new addition — a wonderful observatory constructed, according to a college catalogue of the time, “…after the most approved modern ideas.”

The building was the idea of noted OWU Professor Hiram Mills Perkins, himself an institution and one of the foremost academic astronomers of this day. He was so esteemed as Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy that the building was soon referred to as Perkins Observatory.

Perkins taught at OWU from 1873 to 1907. You can read more about Perkins here. More…

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History/Tourism

Who Was This Delaware Man? Solving A 160 Year Old Mystery

20 Apr , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

EDITOR’S NOTE: We’re still hunting for clues as to the identify of this uniformed sitter. Have an idea or suggestion? Drop us a line at: 1808delaware@gmail.com.

Today we begin a two part series here on 1808Delaware, one which will set out to solve a question that arose recently but which involves a question over a century and a half old – who was this man?

The figure of a soldier peers out of a photograph which recently came into our possession. As with many portraits of that era, there is no writing on the photo’s front or reverse that reveals the identity of the sitter. There are clues, however — clues that, as we did research for this story, brought us face-to-face with two intriguing figures in Delaware County history whose very interesting stories you likely do not know. More…

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Delaware, History/Tourism

Landmarks Of Delaware County: The Delaware Post Office Building

3 Apr , 2021  

By: 1808Delaware

The early decades of the 20th century saw public buildings built across the country, each making a statement about the importance of institutions housed inside their walls.

And, as a bustling city with a population nearing 9,000 inhabitants, a county seat as well as the location for a prominent liberal arts college, Delaware was exactly the kind of place where those investments were being made.

Over 100 years later, the city and the college are both benefiting from the erection of a classically-designed building that has stood the test of time. More…

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History/Tourism

Landmarks Of Delaware County: The Edward E. Neff House

1 Mar , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

We continue our ongoing look at the historic resources of Delaware County with a stop in the Northwest Neighborhood, home of an extraordinary collection of nineteenth and early twentieth century residences and churches.

Today, we look at a house which might best be known as the childhood home of a prolific and prominent architect.

The house at 123 North Franklin Street is a magnificent Queen Anne style structure. It was built by prominent local merchant Edward Erford Neff, who was born in 1830 in Dover, Ohio. Neff was married to Mary Ann Glover in 1862, and the couple went on to have three children — John, Addella, and Clarence. More…

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History/Tourism

Delaware County Roots: The War Governor

24 Feb , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

Over the last two centuries, Delaware County has produced a remarkable set of individuals who have led lives of discovery. This series will reveal short insights into the lives of the well-known and less commonly known people born here, or who lived here, and then went on to make significant contributions to state, regional, or national history.

The second Governor of the State of Kansas was a native Delaware Countian.

He was also someone so respected by his constituents that he earned the nickname, “The War Governor.”

His name was Thomas Carney, and he was born in 1824 near Berkshire. More…

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History/Tourism

Delaware County Roots: Willa Beatrice Player

11 Feb , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

Over the last two centuries, Delaware County has produced a remarkable set of individuals who have led lives of discovery. This series will reveal short insights into the lives of the well-known and less commonly known people born here, or who lived here, and then went on to make significant contributions to state, regional, or national history. We profile these individuals in our “Delaware Roots” series.

A pacsetting American educator once spent a handful of years living in the city of Delaware while attending Ohio Wesleyan University.

Willa Beatrice Player has the distinction of serving as the first African American woman in US history to serve as president of an accredited, four-year college. More…

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History/Tourism

When Delaware County Welcomed: The Fisk Jubilee Singers

10 Feb , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

Did you know that Delaware is one of the places where American musical history was made?

In fact, it was made over 149 years ago, in November 1871.

That month a concert took place in Delaware featuring a group of singers from Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee. That institution of learning, founded a few years previously to provide African American students with the best education possible, was struggling in the post-War south and faced bankruptcy. The idea was advanced by Fisk’s treasurer to have a number of students form a choir which would travel to raise funds for the college. More…

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