History/Tourism

Delaware County Roots: The War Governor

29 Nov , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

Over the last two centuries, Delaware County has produced a remarkable set of individuals who have led lives of discovery. This series will reveal short insights into the lives of the well-known and less commonly known people born here, or who lived here, and then went on to make significant contributions to state, regional, or national history.

The second Governor of the State of Kansas was a native Delaware Countian.

He was also someone so respected by his constituents that he earned the nickname, “The War Governor.”

His name was Thomas Carney, and he was born in 1824 near Berkshire. More…

,

History/Tourism

Rutherford And Lucy’s Thanksgivings

25 Nov , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

Delaware native President Rutherford B. Hayes and Lucy Hayes were certainly no strangers to the Thanksgiving holiday.

Originally, Thanksgiving Day commemorations were declared on a state-by-state basis, and so varied from date to date and from one year to another. Even though President James K. Polk hosted the first such dinner at the White House, it was during the presidency of Abraham Lincoln that a national celebration was established, the President declaring in October the last Thursday in November to be that date.

The Hayes’ first Thanksgiving in the White House was celebrated on November 29, 1877. More…

, , , ,

History/Tourism

When Delaware County Welcomed: Mark Twain

16 Nov , 2021  

By: 1808Delaware

The date was February 10, 1885. That afternoon, three visitors to Delaware exited the train and secured transportation downtown. Making their way to the new City Hall and Opera House, they made their way to the second floor.

One of the men was a well-known novelist of the day, a man known for his written and vocal representations of life in the southern United States. One of the others was an American icon of the first order, an author, raconteur, and humorist.

The two, who were in the midst of their “Twins of Genius” Tour, were George Washington Cable and Samuel L. Clemens, better known as “Mark Twain.” More…

,

History/Tourism

President Hayes Turns Two

28 Oct , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

Well, not really… it’s the statue of President Rutherford B. Hayes that turned two years old earlier this month.

It was on Friday evening, October 4, 2019 that hundreds of onlookers crowded closely together on South Sandusky Street in downtown Delaware — a scene which would certainly not happen in the ear of COVID-19 — and celebrated the unveiling of the city’s statuary tribute to its best-known native son.

We thought that we’d take a look back at that event today on 1808Delaware, including photos we took that evening. Our coverage can be accessed below. More…

, ,

History/Tourism

The Curious Case Of The Caged Convict: A Scene From Delaware History

5 Oct , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

There are hints of Hugo’s Les Miserables in the tale of one Andy Ehman, a man on the run who made Delaware his adopted home 134 years ago.

Actually, it sounds like the stuff of a good movie script – petty crimes, severe penalties, assumed identities, even bigamy.

Ehman was at one point a resident of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, at the time an industrial center in the southern part of the state. In 1879, he was convicted of burglary and sentenced to four years in prison.

In May of 1882, Andy Ehman saw a chance to escape along with 11 of his fellow inmates — even though only a few months remained in his sentence. At high noon, in full view of everyone, they scaled the prison wall and scattered to the wind. Pursuit began, and in the days and weeks that followed, the other 11 were captured. More…

,

History/Tourism

President Hayes Walking Tour On Tap

17 Sep , 2021  

Special to 1808Delaware

The Delaware County Historical Society presents a special walking tour in downtown Delaware. Titled “Young and Old Rutherford B. Hayes Walking Tour”, this event will be held on Sunday, October 3. Three identical tours will be offered – at 1pm, 2:30pm, and 4pm, and are limited to 15 people for each tour.

Tours begin at the Sulfur Spring on Ohio Wesleyan’s Campus across from Selby Stadium and will include locations related to Rutherford B. Hayes’ life. The walk will feature Society volunteers and Hayes reenactors – Devon Hardwick as young Hayes and Bill Rietz as older Hayes. Tour guides will include Brent Carson and Laurie Schaefer.

Young Hayes will describe in detail, childhood memories of what he described as “his world” around the area of West William Street and Franklin Street. Older Hayes will discuss, among other topics, his devotion to his duties as a member of Ohio Wesleyan’s Board of Trustees and in his participation in laying the cornerstone of University Hall. More…

, , ,

History/Tourism

Landmarks Of Delaware County: The Edward E. Neff House

6 Sep , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

We continue our ongoing look at the historic resources of Delaware County with a stop in the Northwest Neighborhood, home of an extraordinary collection of nineteenth and early twentieth century residences and churches.

Today, we look at a house which might best be known as the childhood home of a prolific and prominent architect.

The house at 123 North Franklin Street is a magnificent Queen Anne style structure. It was built by prominent local merchant Edward Erford Neff, who was born in 1830 in Dover, Ohio. Neff was married to Mary Ann Glover in 1862, and the couple went on to have three children — John, Addella, and Clarence. More…

,

History/Tourism

The Delaware Bicyclist Cured By Pink Pills

29 Aug , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

Updated. We ran across this rather strange advertisement the other day in an March, 1898 edition of a Chicago newspaper.

In a narrative ad, what online media types might today call a “sponsored post,” the purveyors of “Dr. Williams’ Pink Pills for Pale People” shared the story of a 17 year old Delaware girl.

Identifying her as Miss Bertha Reed, the daughter of Mr. J. R. Reed of 335 Lake Street, the advertisement begins by noting that “The healthfulness of bicycle riding for women is still a disputed question between eminent physicians and health reformers.” More…

, ,

History/Tourism

Strike Up The Music: Delaware Brass Bands Of The Nineteenth Century

24 Aug , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

Looking back at the annals of history, we can be certain of one thing.

The national passion for brass band music in the nineteenth century was felt here in Delaware County as well. As early as the 1850s, in fact, Delaware was home to a musical ensemble composed solely of brass instruments.

In a piece entitled “The American Brass Band Movement” on the website of the Library of Congress, it shares, “The early 1850s saw the brief flowering of a brilliant style of brass band music that constitutes an important but insufficiently explored part of our musical past.1 The cornets and saxhorns that made up the all-brass bands of the 1850s and remained a popular, though decreasingly prominent, feature of American wind bands through the nineteenth century were capable of producing, in the hands of good players, music of great charm and style.” More…

, ,

History/Tourism

Delaware County Roots: Willa Beatrice Player

22 Aug , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

Over the last two centuries, Delaware County has produced a remarkable set of individuals who have led lives of discovery. Our Delaware County Roots series shares short insights into the lives of the well-known and less commonly known people born here, or who lived here, and then went on to make significant contributions to state, regional, or national history.

A pacseetting American educator once spent a handful of years living in the city of Delaware while attending Ohio Wesleyan University.

Willa Beatrice Player has the distinction of serving as the first African American woman in US history to serve as president of an accredited, four-year college. More…

,

History/Tourism

Everything You Always Wanted To Know About: The First OWU-OSU Football Game

18 Aug , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

The imminent arrival of a new football season is on sports fans’ minds these days, and so we thought we would share a gridiron-related post.

As those “in the know” know, the storied football history of The Ohio State University started right here in Delaware County. Here are details about the school’s first football contest, hosted by the Battling Bishops of Ohio Wesleyan University, which you may not know.

Date: May 3, 1890

Final Score: OSU 20, OWU 14 More…

, , , , ,

History/Tourism

Landmarks Of Delaware County: The CCC&I Depot

11 Aug , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

The 134-year-old railroad passenger depot on Delaware’s Lake Street is a real survivor.

Known by some as the “Big Four” Depot, it actually predates Delaware’s connection to that famed route. In January 1887, when it opened to the public, it was on the Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati & Indianapolis Railroad, known as the “Bee Line.”

In 1889, the Bee Line was purchased by the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago, and St. Louis Railroad, the “Big Four.” More…

, , ,