History/Tourism

Landmarks Of Delaware County: The Felkner-Anderson House

20 Jul , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

They are called “I Houses,” and while Delaware County has several of them there is reputedly only one located in Scioto Township.

The house at 9716 Fontanelle Road dates from 1858, and was built by William Hall Felkner, replacing a log home dating from twenty years earlier built by his father Jacob. The Felkners were early settlers in western Delaware County, coming from Tennessee.

The phrase “I House” is not an official term, but it is a widely accepted way to describe houses from the early to mid 19th century across the Midwest and South that follow a particular pattern. More…

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History/Tourism

Landmarks Of Delaware County: Limestone Vale

2 Jul , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

It’s a piece of Pennsylvania-inspired architecture sitting in the middle of Ohio, and one can easily see why pioneer settler Daniel Stout chose this location on which to build.

Limestone Vale, which consists of a limestone house and stone end barn, was built in the 1850s along what is now Olentangy River Road. It remains in much the condition and setting it enjoyed when constructed.

The unique barn is one of four that survive along the Olentangy dating from before 1860. It is the only one of those to be paired with a stone farmhouse. More…

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History/Tourism

Landmarks Of Delaware County: The Hotel Blee

25 Jun , 2021  

By: 1808Delaware

The three story building sits prominently on the southwest corner of Union and Winter Streets, just as it has since 1890.

The Hotel Blee may have had a troubled beginning, but it continues to provide residential space 130 years later — albeit of a more long-term variety.

The sturdy brick structure at 42-46 East Winter Street was built as a hotel to replace a frame structure on the site, but that purpose didn’t last long. While it is not known who built the building, it is known that a railroad conductor was either involved or purchased the property very shortly after construction. More…

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History/Tourism, Sunbury

Landmarks Of Delaware County Special: Myers Inn, Sunbury

13 Jun , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

We are celebrating this, the 20th post in our Landmarks of Delaware County series, by presenting a uniquely historic county landmark in a new way.

To access the previous 19 posts in this series, visit this link.

The Myers Inn in Sunbury, built by the community’s co-founder Lawrence Myers, is a property powerfully tied to local history. It has had more than one life, and has generated a good deal of deserved attention. More…

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History/Tourism, Ohio Wesleyan University

Landmarks Of Delaware County: OWU Student Observatory

9 May , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

In 1896, the campus of Ohio Wesleyan University welcomed a substantial new addition — a wonderful observatory constructed, according to a college catalogue of the time, “…after the most approved modern ideas.”

The building was the idea of noted OWU Professor Hiram Mills Perkins, himself an institution and one of the foremost academic astronomers of this day. He was so esteemed as Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy that the building was soon referred to as Perkins Observatory.

Perkins taught at OWU from 1873 to 1907. You can read more about Perkins here. More…

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History/Tourism

Landmarks Of Delaware County: The Strand Theatre

21 Apr , 2021  

By 1808 Delaware

This week, we take a brief look at Delaware’s Strand Theatre, one of the oldest continually operating movie theatres in the country.

The celebrate this local icon, we thought we would share a special edition of Landmarks of Delaware County by looking back at the day that “The House Beautiful,” as it was referred to by the Delaware Daily Journal-Herald, opened to the public.

The paper’s April 8, 1916 edition heralded the arrival of the theatre with a full page ad featuring a letter from proprietor Henry Bieiberson, Jr.. More…

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History/Tourism

Landmarks Of Delaware County: Klais Organ In Gray Chapel, OWU

17 Apr , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

The term “landmark” can certainly be applied to things other than buildings. A relatively new object can also be a landmark, depending on the context.

A good case in point is the magnificent Rexford Keller Memorial Organ in University Hall’s Gray Chapel on the campus of Ohio Wesleyan University.

The instrument, built and installed in 1980 by the Klais organ company in Bonn, Germany, is a four manual, tracker action organ with 82 ranks, 55 stops, and 4,644 pipes. It is the largest of the 12 Klais organs in the United States; as it so happens, one of the others is also in Delaware at Asbury United Methodist Church. More…

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Landmarks

Landmarks Of Delaware County: Selby Field

7 Apr , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

It’s one of the iconic early 20th football fields that have survived into the 21st century, still used for its original purpose.

Ohio Wesleyan University’s Selby Field is the home of the Battling Bishops football team, as well as field hockey, track & field, and lacrosse. With a seating capacity of 9,100, all seats fall between the 15 yard lines of the field, making it a remarkable place to watch a sports contest. It remains one of the country’s largest Division III stadiums. More…

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Delaware, History/Tourism

Landmarks Of Delaware County: The Delaware Post Office Building

3 Apr , 2021  

By: 1808Delaware

The early decades of the 20th century saw public buildings built across the country, each making a statement about the importance of institutions housed inside their walls.

And, as a bustling city with a population nearing 9,000 inhabitants, a county seat as well as the location for a prominent liberal arts college, Delaware was exactly the kind of place where those investments were being made.

Over 100 years later, the city and the college are both benefiting from the erection of a classically-designed building that has stood the test of time. More…

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History/Tourism

Landmarks Of Delaware County: The Diadatus Keeler House

30 Mar , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

History records that Diadutus James Keeler, in addition to having a unique name, was an “enterprising man.”

Such a claim is borne out by the fact that after arriving from Vermont in 1819, he became an important farmer in Genoa Township and a recognized breeder of sheep and hogs.

Specifically, those would be fine-wooled sheep and China and Berkshire breeds of hogs.

Keeler was also one of the original elders of the Genoa Presbyterian Church More…

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History/Tourism

Landmarks Of Delaware County: John Cook House, Harlem Township

24 Mar , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

The house on Gorsuch Road is very much part of Delaware County history, as the location on which it sits has a 210 year-plus history.

The John Cook House was the home of John and Helen Tompkins Cook; John was a farmer who also dabbled in raising livestock. When he constructed the house in 1863, doing much of the carpentry himself, he was doing so on land owned by his family since the first decade of the 19th century.

John’s parents, Benajah and Cassandra Cook, came to Ohio after buying 4,000 acres of farmland for the princely sum of $1,700 (something tells us Harlem Township land goes for a bit more today). They were the first settlers from the east to settle here. More…

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History/Tourism

Landmarks Of Delaware County: Samuel Sharp House

17 Mar , 2021  

By 1808Delaware

A bit of the old south may yet survive in, of all places, the northern reaches of Delaware County.

The beautiful Samuel Sharp House at 7436 Horseshoe Road, west of Ashley, is uniquely connected to the American Civil War. It was constructed about 1867 by Samuel and Lorinda Sharp, who had married 13 years earlier.

Samuel Sharp was the son of the well-known William Sharp, known locally as the “greatest bee-hunter” in Marlboro (then Marlborough) Township. The Sharps had several children whose given names, with the exception of one child, all began with the letter “L” — Laura, Landon, Lettie, Leslie, Lawrence, and…. Mary. More…

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